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Tag Archives: take-over bid

Canadian Securities Commissions Consider First Tactical Private Placement Under Canada’s New Take-Over Bid Regime

Earlier today, the Ontario Securities Commission and the British Colombia Securities Commission released their decisions regarding Hecla Mining Co.’s claim that Dolly Varden Silver Corp. had planned to utilize a private placement as an inappropriate defensive tactic.

Posted in Public M&A, Shareholders, Strategy

Since Canada’s new harmonized take-over bid regime (New Bid Regime) came into effect earlier this year, there’s been a lot of talk about whether tactical private placements will become the new poison pills. For more information on the New Bid Regime see our previous article, Canada’s New Take-Over Bid Rules Seek to Level the Playing Field.

A “tactical private placement” occurs when a target company issues securities to a friendly party in response to an unsolicited take-over bid in order to make it more difficult and/or more expensive for the hostile bidder to complete a take-over of the target … Continue Reading

CSA Releases Amendments to the Take-Over Bid Regime

Posted in Private Equity, Public M&A, Shareholders, Strategy

On March 31, 2015, the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) published a CSA Notice and Request for Comment with respect to proposed amendments to Multilateral Instrument 62-104 – Take-Over Bids and Issuer Bids (MI 62-104) and changes to National Policy 62-203 – Take-Over Bids and Issuer Bids.

The proposed amendments codify and in some cases clarify the concepts previously announced by the CSA in September 2014 and result in some significant changes to the take-over bid regime. Please see our detailed report Amendments to Take-Over Bid Rules Will Deliver More Support to Boards for an in-depth review of some of the … Continue Reading

Mini-Tenders 301: Will Such Offers Be Used in Proxy Contests?

Posted in Public M&A, Shareholders, Strategy

This is the final article in our mini-tender trilogy. We have previously discussed mini-tender offers from the perspectives of the offeror, and the issuer and shareholders. This article considers how mini-tenders might be strategically used in proxy contests.

As shareholder activism rises, the activists’ toolkit keeps evolving. The strategic use of a mini-tender offer in a recent proxy contest suggests that such offers may increasingly be considered as a means of influencing the outcome of proxy contests.… Continue Reading

Mini-Tenders 201: Responding to Mini-Tender Offers

Posted in Public M&A, Shareholders, Strategy

In our previous article, we introduced mini-tenders and discussed the factors that should be considered before launching a mini-tender offer. As a refresher, a mini-tender is an offer to purchase securities below the threshold that triggers regulatory rules for take-over bids. Such an offer is not specifically regulated and can be used to acquire small but not insignificant positions in public companies, often at a discount to the prevailing market price.

In this article, we discuss mini-tenders from the perspective of issuers and shareholders.

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Mini-Tenders 101: Factors to Consider Before Launching a Mini-Tender Offer

Posted in Public M&A, Shareholders, Strategy

Mini-tenders have a bad reputation, which may explain why they are used infrequently. This is the first in a trilogy of articles about mini-tender offers from the perspectives of offerors, issuers and shareholders. It reviews factors that an offeror should consider before launching a mini-tender offer.

A mini-tender is simply an offer to purchase securities below the threshold that triggers regulatory rules for take-over bids. Such an offer is not specifically regulated and can be used to acquire small but not insignificant positions in public companies, often at a discount to the prevailing market price.

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Augusta/HudBay – A model for target boards to say “not now”?

Posted in Public M&A, Shareholders, Strategy

The recent outcome of the Augusta/HudBay poison pill hearing provides some insight into how a shareholder rights plan may withstand scrutiny from a Canadian securities regulator for an extended period of time in the right circumstances. Though perhaps the result of somewhat unique facts, including insufficient initial support for the price being offered by the bidder and an active process being conducted by the target company, the British Columbia Securities Commission’s decision in Augusta/HudBay is also of interest in the context of the ongoing debates sparked by the proposed National Instrument 62-105 on Security Holder Rights Plans.… Continue Reading